AOSSM-AANA COMBINED 2021 ANNUAL MEETING. Music City Center. Nashville, TN. July 8-11, 2021 AOSSM-AANA COMBINED 2021 ANNUAL MEETING. Music City Center. Nashville, TN. July 8-11, 2021

Instructional Courses

Don’t miss your opportunity to start your morning off right with relevant, current clinical practice issues and the latest research and treatment strategies by signing up for Instructional Courses! Moderators will ask open-ended questions of participants, and as in clinical practice, the case(s) will unfold gradually, with new information being offered during discussion.

Additional registration is required for Instructional Courses.

  • Fee: $75 each
  • Special Triple Play – Purchase Three Instructional Courses for $200 and save $25!

IC: 101

Title: Knee Multiple Ligament Injuries: What Would You Do?

Location: MCC 209

Course Description:
Experienced faculty will present complex knee multiple ligament cases to other faculty and the audience and pause at critical junctures to ask the audience "What would you do?". Each faculty member will discuss treatment options at their individual round table and then share with the audience when called upon by the moderator. Faculty will alternate case presentations and the moderator will carefully select the cases to ensure that there is a good balance of cases. The moderator has extensive experience with round table instructional course lectures and these sessions have received high marks at both AAOS and AOSSM meetings. Faculty are encouraged to question indications, timing, technique, and critically analyze imaging and results. Attendees will see all combinations of knee multiple ligament injuries and learn many treatment options.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the classification of knee multiple ligament injuries (MLI).
  • Identify key knee examination findings for each MLI case.
  • Match key imaging findings with the correct MLI diagnosis.
  • Discuss different surgical techniques for each knee MLI.
  • Describe outcomes following treatment of knee MLI.

Faculty
Mark D. Miller, MD
Alan M. Getgood, MD, FRCS (Tr&Orth)
Darren L. Johnson, MD
Robert G. Marx, MD, MSc, FRCSC
Volker Musahl, MD
Gehron Treme, MD
Scott T. Watson

IC: 102

Title: Patellofemoral Instability from Simple to Complex: How to Get It Right and Avoid Complications

Location: MCC 205

Course Description:
This is highly interactive, case-based learning in small groups, with a moderator introducing cases for discussion at each table with individual faculty. Key concepts covered include optimizing MPFL reconstruction techniques and how to recognize when to address the various anatomic risk factors that contribute to patella instability. These include malalignment with elevated TT-TG, valgus malalignment, patella alta, rotational deformities, and trochlear dysplasia. When is an MPFL reconstruction not enough, and which anatomic risk factors should be addressed and how? What adjustments are made for open physes? The international faculty represents very experienced PF surgeons with a lot to share in this area that can be controversial and not always clear cut.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will understand techniques to optimize MPFL reconstruction and how to troubleshoot to avoid complications.
  • To improve knowledge of radiographic imaging to recognize, measure, and make decisions about various anatomic risk factors for PF instability. What should the threshold be to change the anatomy?
  • To understand techniques to address the risk factors as part of correcting PF instability and avoiding recurrent instability or complications.
  • To provide a highly interactive small group learning format that enables engaged learning by the participants with individual faculty.

Faculty
David R. Diduch, MD
Jacqueline Munch Brady, MD
Andrew J. Cosgarea, MD
David H. DeJour, MD
James L. Pace, MD
Beth E. Shubin Stein, MD
Sabrina M. Strickland, MD
Adam B. Yanke, MD, PhD

IC: 103

Title: Common Shoulder Problems in Overhead Sports: An Interactive, Round Table, Case-Based, Problem-Solving Session

Location: MCC 204

Course Description:
This IC round table will be an interactive session, which is case based and dealing with 4 very common problems seen with overhead sporting activities. Monitors will be placed at 10 tables and individual cases presented. A faculty member will be at each table leading group discussions and then discussion with all tables will take place. Faculty members will rotate tables after each case. An audience response system will be used at each table to facilitate discussion.

Learning Objectives:

  • The participant will learn the scope of treating SLAP lesions from non-operative treatments to surgical options and techniques in the baseball athlete.
  • The participant will learn the scope of treating the baseball athlete with internal rotation deficit from non-operative treatments to surgical options and techniques.
  • The participant will learn the scope of both non-operative and surgical treatments of the challenging, athletic, multidirectional instability patient.
  • The participant will learn the scope of treatment options for AC joint separations and the literature and personal experiences which support the different treatment options.

Faculty
Michael T. Freehill, MD
Asheesh Bedi, MD
Stephen F. Brockmeier, MD
W. Ben Kibler, MD
Stephen E. Lemos, MD, PhD
Albert Lin, MD
George A. Paletta, MD
Richard K.N. Ryu, MD
Felix H. Savoie, III, MD
John M. Tokish, MD
Nikhil N. Verma, MD

IC: 104

Title: Emerging Techniques in ACL Reconstruction and Augmentation

Location: MCC 202

Course Description:
This IC will familiarize the surgeon with innovative techniques for ACL reconstruction and augmentation, including lateral extra-articular tenodesis and internal suture tape augmentation. Faculty will discuss current biomechanical and clinical research on each topic; the decision-making process for each concept; current clinical outcomes in the literature; and individual techniques with accompanied video demonstration. Lectures will review indications, and interactive case presentations with video will highlight technical tips and pearls for success.

Learning Course:
Upon completion participants will be able to describe and conduct the techniques for an all-inside, quadriceps ACL reconstruction, a lateral sided extra-articular procedure and an internal augmentation procedure.

Faculty
Clayton W. Nuelle, MD
Michael J. Alaia, MD
Seth L. Sherman, MD
Patrick A. Smith, MD

IC: 105

Title: The Future of Hip Arthroscopy – Innovations for Current Practices

Location: MCC 201

Course Description:
This IC lecture presents a case-based approach to innovations in hip arthroscopy and current treatment guidelines of various hip pathologies from renowned world leaders in the field. Labral repair, labral reconstruction, treatment of femoroacetabular impingement, biologics, capsular management, and 3D modeling will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe most relevant evidence for indications for labral pathology treatment.
  • Describe technical pearls and outcomes for labral reconstruction and repair.
  • Describe technical pearls and outcomes for abductor and hamstring repair.
  • Describe technical pearls and outcomes for capsular management.
  • Understand new and innovative techniques for optimizing hip arthroscopy outcomes in the context of FAI.

Faculty
Ivan H. Wong, MD, FRCSC, MAcM
Jovan Laskovski, MD
Shane J. Nho, MD, MS
Marc J. Philippon, MD

IC: 106

Title: Cartilage Injury of the Knee: Current Controversies in 2021

Location: MCC 208

Course Description:
This IC will focus on current, case-based treatment strategies for articular cartilage, highlighting the controversies and different approaches from a diverse faculty perspective.

Course Objectives:

  • Recognize the current indications for nonoperative and operative treatment options for focal cartilage lesions.
  • Understand the “best” evidence available for nonoperative and operative treatment options for focal cartilage lesions.
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of different surgical options for the knee with articular cartilage defects and arthritis.

Faculty
Aaron J. Krych, MD
Paul E. Caldwell III, MD
Jack Farr II, MD
Rachel M. Frank, MD
Andreas H. Gomoll, MD

IC: 107

Title: Large Rotator Cuff Tears: Repair, Release, Patch, SCR, Reverse: A Case-Based Symposium

Location: MCC 207

Course Description:
This IC will include a series of interactive, case-based presentations showing examples of various large rotator cuff tears and the best treatment solutions for each.

Learning Objective:

Evaluate and treat patients with large rotator cuff tears. Participants will be given concrete case examples for surgical techniques and proper decision making from simple repair, to releases, to augmented repairs, to superior capsular reconstruction and when direct progression to reverse Total Shoulder Replacement would be best.

Faculty
Joseph C. Tauro, MD
Ian K.Y. Lo, MD
Patrick St Pierre, MD

IC: 108

Title: Management of Ulnar Collteral Ligament Tears: Where Do We Stand in 2021?

Location: MCC 206

Course Description:
The purpose of this roundtable is to review the most up to date strategies for treatment of UCL injuries including the use of biologics, UCL repair, primary UCL reconstruction, and revision UCL reconstruction. The panel will review several complete cases and will work through each case from diagnosis to management to return to play. The participants will be taken through each case and asked how they would proceed at varying steps in management. The faculty will provide pearls based on their experience in dealing with these difficult cases.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the prevalence of UCL tears as well as the proper steps to diagnosis.
  • Understand the various treatment strategies for UCL tears including biologics, UCL repair, and UCL reconstruction.
  • Understand the different variables involved in each treatment, and how best to decide on each treatment strategy.
  • Understand differences in rehabilitation between the various treatment strategies and how this impacts decision making and return to sport.

Faculty
Brandon J. Erickson, MD
Christopher S. Ahmad, MD
Jeffrey R. Dugas, MD
Mark S. Schickendantz, MD

IC: 201

Title: A-Case Based Approach for Meniscus Repair and Transplantation: Reconsidering Indications, Techniques and Biologic Augmentation

Location: MCC 209

Course Description:
The meniscus is vital to normal knee function and the health of the articular cartilage. While meniscus tears are very common, we proportionately devote little time and resources into improving our surgical indications and technique for meniscus preservation and restoration. Recently there have been advances in recognition of tear pattern and surgical treatment of meniscus pathology. As a surgeon, it is important to understand how and when patients can benefit from these procedures.

This course will provide a case-based approach to guidelines on how to recognize and treat a variety of meniscus pathology in the isolated and concomitant setting. Recognition of specific tear patterns, including full-thickness radial tears, complex tears, and root tears will be emphasized. Variations of surgical techniques, such as transtibial pull-out for root tears, novel all-inside techniques, gold standard repair techniques, and transplantation will be covered. In addition, emerging biologic augmentation will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants should be able to understand how to recognize tear patterns from preoperative MRI and intraoperative arthroscopy and utilize this information for planning and execution of meniscus preservation techniques.
  • At the completion of this session, participants should be able to understand indications for meniscus repair in the active patient, pearls and pitfalls of a variety of repair techniques, as well as anticipated outcomes.
  • At the completion of this session, participants should be able to recognize complex tears patterns, such as meniscus root tears and radial tears, and understand treatment options, including a variety of repair techniques.
  • Participants should be able to understand indications for meniscus transplant, current controversies, and expected outcomes in the setting of meniscus transplantation and concomitant combined procedures, such as osteotomy and ligament reconstruction.

Faculty
James L. Pace, MD
James L. Carey, MD, MPH
Jorge Chahla, MD, PhD
Thomas M. DeBerardino, MD
Andreas H. Gomoll, MD
Laith M. Jazrawi, MD
Aaron J. Krych, MD
Scott A. Rodeo, MD

IC: 202

Title: Shoulder Arthritis In Young Active Patients - What Are The Best Options?

Location: MCC 205

Course Description:
Shoulder arthritis in the young patient has become a more common problem, and the treatment options for these patients are numerous. A clear understanding of the available treatment options, and which patients are appropriate for each option is imperative to proper management of this problem. The goal of the IC is to cover the entire spectrum of arthritis in the young patient. The IC will begin with diagnosis, including pearls for the physical exam and what imaging tests are most appropriate and afford the most information for clinical decision making. Next, arthroscopic treatment options including microfracture, MACI, osteochondral allografts and others will be discussed. This will be followed by a discussion on soft tissue glenoid resurfacing and the ream and run procedure. Surgical pearls for each procedure will be provided. Anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty will then be discussed in detail including when to indicate young patients for this procedure and how to make sure the shoulder is truly “anatomic.” Lastly, complications, more specifically how to diagnose and manage these complications, following the above procedures will be discussed. The IC will conclude with 2-3 case presentations in which the audience is asked to participate and interact with the faculty.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand diagnosis including physical exam and imaging options for young patients presenting with arthritic changes.
  • Understand non-arthroplasty treatment options for these patients including cartilage repair and restoration (MACI, Osteochondral allograft, etc.)
  • Understand technical pearls and outcomes for soft tissue resurfacing of the glenoid as well as the ream and run procedure, and which patients could potentially benefit from one of these procedures.
  • Understand when to perform an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, and what it truly means to be "anatomic."
  • Understand potential complications including infection, failure, and others following the above treatment options as well as how to deal with these.

Faculty
Anthony A. Romeo, MD
Brandon J. Erickson, MD
Matthew T. Provencher, MD MC USNR (Ret.)
Samuel A. Taylor, MD

IC: 203

Title: Extra-Articular Pathologies About the Hip - When to Scope and When to Open

Location: MCC 204

Course Description:
This IC will feature a case-based as well as evidence base guide with round table discussion on extra-articular pathologies about the hip. Discussions with focus on endoscopic and open gluteus medius/minimus repairs with or without biologic augmentation, endoscopic and open hamstring repairs - both acute and chronic, as well as complete and partial, as well as adductor pathology as repair versus conservative treatment has become more controversial. These topics will lead to great discussion regarding current orthopaedic literature as well as endoscopic and open techniques.

Learning Objectives:

  • Establishing criteria for surgical vs. conservative management of extra-articular pathologies about the hip.
  • Surgical techniques for endoscopic management of hamstring, abductor, and adductor injuries.
  • Surgical techniques for open management of hamstring, abductor, and adductor injuries.
  • How to manage hamstring, abductor, and adductor injuries in the athlete.

Faculty
Michael B. Banffy, MD
Guillaume D. Dumont, MD, MBA
Michael B. Gerhardt, MD
Joshua D. Harris, MD
Jovan Laskovski, MD
Robert Westermann, MD

IC: 204

Title: Controversies in the Use of Grafts and Patches in Rotator Cuff Surgery: Augmentation, Interposition, Reinforcement, Superior Capsular Reconstruction and Bio-Inductive Scaffolds

Location: MCC 202

Course Description: Following participation in this IC, learners should be able to complete the following: recite the biology and mechanics of rotator cuff grafts and patches; identify the indications for augmentation, interposition, superior capsular reconstructions and bio-inductive in-growth scaffolds; and describe the state-of-the-art surgical techniques for arthroscopic graft implantation.

The course will begin with a short overview of graft and patch options available for implantation, followed by a case-based discussion of indications for surgery, state of the art surgical techniques, avoiding complications and a robust discussion of short as well as long-term outcomes. There will be an emphasis on attendee participation and interaction with the faculty.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and comprehend the role of grafts and patches in rotator cuff surgery.
  • Identify the clinical and radiological criteria for specific graft selection.
  • Have a familiarity with state-of-the-art arthroscopic surgical techniques for graft implantation as well as understanding potential complications and how to avoid them.

Faculty
Richard K.N. Ryu, MD
Jeffrey S. Abrams, MD
Mark H. Getelman, MD
John M. Tokish, MD

IC: 205

Title: Complications – Surgeons’ Worst Enemy & Best Teacher

Location: MCC 201

Course Description:
Not ‘if’ but ‘when’ – complications are an inevitable part of life as a surgeon. Although sometimes simple in theory, dealing with complications represents a challenge for many of us, and our response to these difficult events and the patients affected by them speaks to our effectiveness as physicians. Young surgeons, in particular, are often unprepared for the bouts of failure that lay ahead.

Yet complications are perhaps our best educator and can be an important catalyst for improvement. Faculty will present the worst complications of their careers as it relates to common shoulder, elbow, and knee surgeries. We will discuss both the technical errors and subsequent changes made as well as the life lessons learned along the way. This is intended to be a practical, ‘in-the-trenches’ approach to minimize complications, manage bad outcomes and deliberately improve going forward.

Learning Objectives:

  • Shoulder instability – it’s just a labral repair, what could go wrong? The importance of the doctor-patient relationship.
  • Throwing elbow – lessons learned from technical errors.
  • Patellofemoral joint – finding success through failure, the importance of preoperative planning.
  • ACL – simple surgeries are not always so simple, developing grit and improving your next 20 ACLs.

Faculty
Matthew A. Tao, MD
Christopher S. Ahmad, MD
Beth E. Shubin Stein, MD
Alison P. Toth, MD

IC: 206

Title: The Business of Medicine: Hospital-Based, Academic, Private Practice – Learning How To Succeed

Location: MCC 208

Course Description:
This IC will give physicians a comprehensive understanding of all aspects of medicine from health insurance and coding to marketing and enhancing your visibility to compete in the current healthcare marketplace with a sports medicine practice. This course will also include the care of patients with COVID-19, and tricks for telemedicine to succeed and maintain income will be discussed. This course will build the foundation to allow the physician a comfort level within the business aspects of a successful practice. Introductory lectures that build on the previous year’s topics will allow for multi-year rotation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain when and why marketing can positively affect a medical or hospital practice while analyzing the competitive marketplace to formulate a value proposition and apply it to a market segmentation targeting the right consumer.
  • Discuss the role of branding and customer loyalty to review the importance of an integrated marketing platform and allow for interpretation of key metrics.
  • Understand the essentials of billing and coding to improve reimbursement and create an efficient, successful financial model through the utilization of physician extenders.
  • Define the concept of consumerism and realize the role of social media and decision making by patients.
  • Understand the intricate finances of a practice or department of orthopaedics & the role of ambulatory surgical centers, outpatient surgery, in and out of network and how to use your physician assistant and nurse practitioner to compete effectively.

Faculty
Kevin D. Plancher, MD, MPH
Brian J. Cole, MD, MBA
Hussein A. Elkousy, MD
Louis F. McIntyre, MD
Allston J. Stubbs, IV, MD, MBA

IC: 207

Title: Team Physician Update: It’s Not a Knee or a Shoulder Injury, Am I Doing it Right?

Location: MCC 207

Course Description:
Most orthopedic team physicians can expertly manage common knee and shoulder injuries, like MCL sprains, ACL tears and shoulder instability. However, many sports surgeons are less comfortable with the sideline and definitive management of foot & ankle, hip, hand and spine injuries. In many settings, the appropriate subspecialty care is either not available or unfamiliar with treating high-level athletes and it is therefore the team physician’s responsibility to definitively manage or at least guide the care of these athletes.

The goal of this course is to provide the team physician with a concise update on current concepts and trends regarding the management of foot & ankle, hip, hand and spine injuries in high-level athletes. This course will explore many evolving and controversial topics including acute surgical stabilization of high ankle sprains, the relationship between hip pathology and core muscle injuries, definitive management of scapholunate ligament injuries and role of cervical fusion vs. disc replacement in competitive athletes. The presenters will use a combination of evidence-based medicine and clincal cases to provide attendees with an algorithmic approach to managing these controversial injuries. Audience participation will be a critical element of the session and ample time will be left for case presentations, questions and discussion.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the evaluation and management of high ankle sprains, Lisfranc & turf toe injuries, as well as fifth metatarsal fractures including pertinent exam findings, imaging modalities and evolving indications for surgical stabilization.
  • Discuss the use of intra-articular hip injections in the work up and management of groin pain. Clarify indications and timing of hip arthroscopy and provide return to play guidelines.
  • Review the relationship between hip pathology and core muscles injuries. Which one should I fix? When should I fix both?
  • Review the current trends in sideline and definitive management of hand & wrist injuries including metacarpal & phalanx fractures, scapholunate ligament injuries, scaphoid fractures and UCL injuries. When is it safe to return to play?
  • Review the current controversies related to cervical & lumbar spine injuries in athletes. When can a player return after an ACDF? Is there a role for disc replacement? Treatment options for stress fractures and disc herniations in the lumbar spine.

Faculty
Gautam Yagnik, MD
Andrew B. Dossett, MD
Craig S. Mauro, MD
Steven S. Shin, MD, MMSc
Norman Waldrop, III, MD

IC: 208

Title: So, You’ve Mastered MPFL Reconstruction: What Else to Add, and When?

Location: MCC 206

Course Description:
Surgical techniques in MPFL reconstruction for the treatment of patellar instability have become increasingly popularized. However, optimal outcomes require that concurrent factors related to morphology or alignment are addressed at the time of soft tissue reconstruction. We review the treatment algorithm for when and why to add concurrent procedures and provide pearls on how to perform them while avoiding complications. Cases demonstrating multiple concurrent factors will be presented to highlight each principle.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand when and how to add anteromedializing osteotomy in the setting of coronal malalignment, and how to avoid complications.
  • Understand when and how to add distalizing tuberosity osteotomy in the setting of patella alta, and how to avoid complications.
  • Understand when and how to add trochleoplasty techniques in the setting of severe trochlear dysplasia, and how to avoid complications.
  • Understand when and how to add lateral release or lengthening in the setting of lateral soft tissue contractures, and how to avoid complications.

Faculty
Miho J. Tanaka, MD, MS
Elizabeth A. Arendt, MD
Andrew J. Cosgarea, MD
Jack Farr, II, MD
Adam B. Yanke, MD, PhD

IC: 301

Title: Revision ACL Reconstruction: Getting it Right the Second Time

Location: MCC 209

Course Description:
Experienced ACL surgeons will show actual cases of complex revision ACL reconstruction and other faculty and the audience will have an opportunity to comment and ask questions. Topics covered will include dealing with previous tunnels, concurrent osteotomies, graft selection, one- versus two-stage procedures, and a variety of other topics. Select faculty will present cases on an alternating basis pausing at strategic intervals to ask, "what would you do?". Round table discussions will be proctored by each faculty at individual tables and shared with the group as directed by the moderator. The moderator has extensive experience with this ICL format and has received high marks at AAOS and AOSSM Round Table ICLs in the past.

Learning Objectives:

  • Determine the cause of ACL failure for each case.
  • Discuss graft options in revision ACL reconstruction.
  • Discuss tunnel options in revision ACL reconstruction.
  • Define osteolysis and outline treatment options.
  • Describe one- versus two-stage revision ACL reconstruction.

Faculty
Mark D. Miller, MD
Annunziato Amendola, MD
Kevin F. Bonner, MD
Daniel E. Cooper, MD
Darren L. Johnson, MD
Robert G. Marx, MD, MSc, FRCSC
Gehron Treme, MD

IC: 302

Title: No Bone? No Problem. How to Successfully Manage Glenohumeral Instability with Bone Loss

Location: MCC 205

Course Description:
In 2015, JBJS published a Topics in Training article titled “Impact of Fellowship Training in Clinical Practice of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine”. They surveyed sports medicine trained fellows who had been in practice an average of nine years, asking in particular, their comfort level with a variety of surgical procedures. Responders displayed a high comfort level with all shoulder procedures, except bone loss instability. In this case, only 31.5% of responders felt “very comfortable” treating this entity. Therefore, the goal of this Round Table Instructional Course is to provide an interactive case-based discussion of complex cases in glenohumeral instability with bone loss. A series of illustrative cases will be presented including history, exam findings, and imaging addressing glenoid, humeral, and bipolar bone loss. These cases will be discussed in small groups with course faculty at the round tables and subsequently as a larger group. Brief discussion of evidence-based literature for the chosen treatment and technical tips and tricks will then be provided for the chosen treatment.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand methods for identifying and quantifying bone loss in the setting of recurrent instability.
  • Have a better understanding of when it is necessary to address humeral sided bone loss (the Hill-Sachs lesions) and the learn about the most prevalent methods to surgically address the Hill –Sachs lesions
  • Grasp the indications for addressing glenoid sided bone loss and the most common techniques to address this bone loss!
  • Gain a better understanding of the clinical scenarios in which one will encounter posterior glenoid bone loss and learn the best methods to address this pathology.
  • Learn tips and tricks to assist in executing all the surgical methods discussed.

Faculty
Gregory L. Cvetanovich, MD
Julie Y. Bishop, MD
Stephen F. Brockmeier, MD
Peter N. Chalmers, MD
C. Benjamin Ma, MD
Ivan H. Wong, MD, FRCSC, MAcM

IC: 303

Title: Ethical Dilemmas in Sports Medicine

Location: MCC 204

Course Description:
The Team Physician has many challenges, some of most difficult involve ethical dilemmas. Whenever an injury occurs the team physician typically has a few minutes on the sidelines to clear a player to continue to play. The physician may be pressured by the coach for a quick decision, with the coach often expecting the player to be cleared to play on. The physician must consider the short and long-term risks and benefits to the player if he or she continues to play. The physician's primary responsibility is towards the player, regardless of the coach/manager's wishes. The player who sustains a knee ligament injury, a concussion, or a shoulder dislocation in season, often wants to recover and allowed back participating even if continuing puts the athlete at risk for further injury. These and many other thorny issues will be discussed in a round table fashion, giving the participants the ability to share stories and concerns.

Learning Objectives:

  • The Team Physicians Prime Directive is the long-term health of the athlete.
  • Confidentiality of the Athlete and HIPPA: understand the rules.
  • Discuss the ethical issues with the female athlete.
  • Evaluate best options for in-season injuries.
  • Have participants share their experience with ethical dilemmas.

Faculty
Edward R. McDevitt, MD
Marlene DeMaio, MD
John D. Kelly, IV MD
Lance E. LeClere, MD

IC: 304

Title: Hype, Promise and Reality: Orthopaedic Use of Biologics in 2021

Location: MCC 202

Course Description:
Orthobiologics is an emerging field that offers great promise, but the interest in the lay press has outstripped the science. This ICL will cover the established applications of orthobiologics, as well as emerging areas of interest, and the regulatory aspects of using these emerging devices and products.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the available biologics for orthopedics.
  • Be exposed to the investigational work in orthobiologics.
  • Understand an overview of the regulatory aspects of orthobiologics.

Faculty
Stephen C. Weber, MD
Jason L. Dragoo, MD
Louis F. McIntyre, MD
Scott A. Rodeo, MD

IC: 305

Title: Hip Arthroscopy - My Worst Day in the Operating Room in 2020: What Happened and How it Changed My Practice

Location: MCC 201

Course Description:
Hip arthroscopy is a rapidly growing and evolving field in orthopaedic sports medicine. The ability to incorporate this field into the general sports practice is highly attractive and desirable, as this allows the orthopaedic sports surgeon to treat a unique young, athletic pathologic spectrum. Given this, hip arthroscopy has expanded to allow treatment of more complex pathologies and has been used with increasing frequency throughout the US and internationally. As hip arthroscopy surgical volumes increase, it is of paramount importance to know and identify the intraoperative pitfalls and complications that occur - even in a high-volume hip arthroscopy surgical practice. It is of equal, if not higher importance to understand how to avoid and manage these complications when they occur.

This course will specifically focus on actual unplanned intraoperative worst day in the OR scenarios that have occurred in the high-volume hip arthroscopy practices of the course faculty over the past year. Specifically, the discussion will include a detailed description of the worst day in the operating room for each of the presenters, how the issue was identified and addressed, and how this experience changed future practice for the faculty. This will be a case-based learning environment in which the case will be presented followed by the ensuing "Worst Day in the OR" and the subsequent aftermath and related practice changing decisions.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the completion of this session, participants should be able to identify the factors that contributed to the creation of the hip arthroscopy problem and explain why these factors were not recognized.
  • At the completion of this session, participants should be able to develop a pre-operative plan to avoid or mitigate the risk of creating or encountering the presented surgical complications.
  • At the completion of this session, participants should be able to adequately address and correct these surgical complications if or when they are encountered.
  • At the completion of this session, participants should be able to summarize the most effective techniques that were employed to change practice to avoid these surgical issues in their own clinical practices.

Faculty
Travis G. Maak, MD
Richard C. Mather, III, MD, MBA
Shane J. Nho, MD, MS
Marc J. Philippon, MD
Michael J. Salata, MD

IC: 306

Title: Case-based Approach to the Management of AC Joint Injuries – An International Perspective

Location: MCC 208

Course Description:
Through a case-based approach, this course will provide a comprehensive review of the diagnosis and management of AC joint injuries. Outcomes and return to play following AC and CC ligament reconstruction will also be discussed in detail. An international perspective will be incorporated throughout to highlight similarities and differences with management of AC joint injuries in the United States.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the anatomy, function, and common mechanisms of injury of the AC Joint.
  • Discuss options for management of acute vs chronic AC joint injury.
  • Review common complications and outcomes following AC and CC ligament reconstruction.

Faculty
Mary K. Mulcahey, MD
Andreas B. Imhoff, MD
Matthew T. Provencher, MD, MC, USNR (Ret.)
Anthony A. Romeo, MD

IC: 307

Title: Joint Preservation Techniques for the Knee in 2021: The Utility of Biologics, Osteotomies, and Cartilage Restoration Procedures

Location: MCC 207

Course Description:
The goal of this IC is to provide a comprehensive overview of joint preservation techniques for the knee, including biologic and reconstructive approaches, with an emphasis on evidence-based treatment guidelines for young, high-demand patients.

Learning Objectives:

  • To discuss technical pearls for performing combined cartilage restoration, meniscus transplantation, ligament reconstruction, and/or realigning osteotomies.
  • To discuss indications for biologic augmentation to joint preservation techniques in the setting of cartilage and/or meniscal restoration.
  • To discuss management of the young, high level athlete requiring cartilage/meniscal restoration.
  • To go through controversial clinical cases and determine best-practice treatment options.

Faculty
Rachel M. Frank, MD
Michael J. Alaia, MD
Seth L. Sherman, MD
Armando F. Vidal, MD

IC: 308

Title: Orthopaedic Innovation: From Inspiration to the OR

Location: MCC 206

Course Description:
The goal of this IC will be to provide an understanding of the dynamics of orthopaedic product and software development to aid in the care of orthopaedic patients. Discussion topics will include: cultivation of the creative process; patent protection process; non-disclosure agreements (NDAs); prototype and software development; licensing agreements; royalty arrangements; business development considerations; and commercialization options.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the course, participant will have an understanding of the process & options for orthopaedic product innovation & software development. The IC will include information regarding the patent protection process, non-disclosure agreements (NDA), prototype & software development, licensing agreements, royalty arrangements, business development considerations, and commercialization options.

Faculty
Raymond Thal, MD
Nathaniel P. Cohen, MD
Stewart Gitler, JD
Stephen B. Gunther, MD
Michael T. Havig, MD

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